Worth the Wait: The Lines of Los Angeles

Los Angeles makes iconic hot dogs, sneaks, cookies, and cupcakes so good, L.A. might as well be called “line forms here”.

You can’t consider visiting L.A.’s most sought-after spots without hesitating over the certainty of the long wait. There are so many reasons people line up in Los Angeles, everything from a Whole Foods line to getting sneakers on Melrose. Here are some the most popular lines in Los Angeles and we’ll divulge which lines are worth the wait and which are a waste of your time.


Pink’s Hot Dogs

 

 

This iconic L.A. hot dog hut is notorious for having lines wrapping around it. If there’s no line, Pink’s Hot Dog stand looks naked. There’s just something special in biting into a Pink’s hot dog, there’s a good snap to the skin. The fries also are a cut above — crispy on the outside, soft inside, and nicely seasoned. Be wary that Pink’s has been a tourist mecca and will always be a tourist mecca. While waiting in line, you can look at the spread of cheesy 8×10 celebrity photos and ponder how many people actually order a Brando or a Rosie O’Donnell (they’re among Pink’s “star dogs”). Although it may be a tourist mecca, it’s not “too touristy”. If you pass by Pink’s, I say go for it — if there is a hot dog worth standing in line for, Pink’s is it. The food can range from good to great and the iconic L.A. kitsch factor can’t be beaten.


In-N-Out

 

 

Every non-L.A. resident is bound to hit up In-N-Out, take a few Instagrams of their burgers with some sort of basic hashtags like #LAvibes or #fitnesslol. But know that they probably waited about 25-30 minutes. God bless the In-N-Out workers hiring a sort of “bellhop” guy to take your order on an iPad as you slowly snake forward in the line. But once you’re inside it’s not much better. The line moves just as slow in there too. The time spent in line is usually boring and not worth the mediocre burgers. There’s plenty of other amazing burger joints to check out that have little to line to wait in. I may get dragged to L.A. hell for this, but In-N-Out is overrated. There, I said it.


Diddy Riese

 

 

A slab of ice cream barely contained between two chewy cookies from Diddy Riese in totally worth the eight to twelve minutes wait. It’s messy, but that’s part of the fun. Since it’s in Westwood, there are gaggles of UCLA students, which means (bonus!) you get to eavesdrop on their college dramas while you wait. If the line is too long, you can always try another dessert alternative, Stan’s Donuts, which is also Westwood icon and just across the street. It’s not touristy, just popular amongst the local college kids. It’s probably the most worth-the-wait stop on this list unless you have something against cookies and ice cream.


Eggslut

 

 

If you’re at Downtown L.A.’s Grand Central Market and have 25 minutes to spare, Eggslut’s bacon, egg & cheese sandwich lives up to the hype. Everything about their sandwich is harmonious. The egg is soft, but not too runny. The bacon is thick and crisp and the finishing touch of the spicy ketchup adds a kick without massacring your taste buds. Also, standing in line at Grand Central Market isn’t a total bore. With all the hipsters around, it feels like you’re standing in a real-life episode of Girls. If you have no patience for the line, the Market has plenty of other alternatives like Sticky Rice, Olio, and Wexler’s. Should you wait? Do it — the food is four stars, and you’d have to wait at the alternatives, too, anyway.


Sprinkles Cupcakes

 

 

I’m personally not a fan of cupcakes, but I’ll admit, Sprinkles makes some damn good dark chocolate cupcake and black & white cupcakes. The icing doesn’t overwhelm the cake, and the actual cake is perfectly moist (yes, even I cringe at the word “moist” but deal with it). Is it worth the eight to ten minutes wait? Nah. You can satisfy your sweet tooth at such mainstays as Bob’s Donuts or Bennett’s Ice Cream. Granted, it is a good cupcake. But it’s still a cupcake, and gourmet cupcakes are always better when someone else is buying.


Supreme Store

 

 

There’s a special sense of togetherness that can develop with the strangers around you in line. Especially in the North Fairfax Avenue camp outside the Supreme store that can last for four days. And all the wait is to enter a promised land of limited release skater apparel and coolness with a price tag. With the death of shopping malls in the past few years, it’s a way for people to come together. It’s being filled in part by this society of kids, some known to each other only from the internet, all of them into this niche product that acts as a social identifier. For them, standing in line for a T-shirt or baseball cap is a way of telling the world that you know about something that not everyone is hip to. The queue is partly a resellers’ market: energetic young entrepreneurs snapping up wares in multiples, then flipping them at soaring markups on eBay or selling them for pocket change to finance their own buys. For many, the wait itself is sufficient reward. As Andy Warhol said, “The possibility of never getting in is exciting,” Warhol mused. “But after that, waiting to get in is the most exciting”. Don’t stand in line in hopes of scoring sneakers, just do it for that sense of community and culture that the Supreme store breeds.

 

Find on the map hereunder the places listed in the article (except In-N-Out, which has 25 restaurants in Los Angeles).

Supreme

439 N Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036, États-Unis

learn more

Sprinkles

Sprinkles, South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, Californie, États-Unis

learn more

Sprinkles

Sprinkles Cupcakes, The Grove Drive, Los Angeles, Californie, États-Unis

learn more

Sprinkles

Sprinkles Cupcakes, South Santa Monica Boulevard, Beverly Hills, Californie, États-Unis

learn more

Eggslut

Eggslut, South Broadway, Los Angeles, Californie, États-Unis

learn more

Diddy Riese

Diddy Riese, 926 Broxton Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90024, États-Unis

learn more

Pink's Hot Dogs

Pink's Hot Dogs, North La Brea Avenue, Los Angeles, Californie, États-Unis

learn more

 

Cover Picture Courtesy of Kent Kanouse (Flickr Creative Commons)

Eden Dranger is writer and native Los Angelino. When not screenwriting or freelance writing, Eden can be found eating nachos and playing with her hair. During pre and post nacho eating, Eden is probably vintage shopping at L.A. flea markets or watching old movies. If none of the above applies, you might find her at home deciding which romper reflects her mood today.
FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsApp